Mark 5:1-17; 7:24-37 — Healing enemies

Reading:  Mark 5:1-17, 7:24-37

When we read the how Jesus went to the land of the Garasenes, many things stand out. There is the fact this encounter took place in a graveyard, that the Demons were named Legion, that these demons went into pigs, and killed the entire herd of pigs, and that when they saw the formerly demon possessed man healed and in his right mind, they were afraid and asked Jesus to leave.

When I think of this, I notice that the land of the Garasenes is a place, so I look at a map. Looking at the map from this time period, I see on the coast of the Sea of Galilee is a city named Hippus, then after that you walk about 6 miles crossing the river Yarmuk and arrive at Gadara. Gerasa is deep inland, located at the same place as the modern Jordanian city of Jerash — which is more like a 40 mile walk. There is some variation in manuscripts however — some appear to refer to Gerasa, other appear to mention Gadara. Either way, to get to his destination, he had to cross the territory of at least one city state, and at minimum he had to walk a couple hours inland and cross a river.

Hippus, Gadara, Gerasa are all cities in a region know as Decapolis. Decapolis was a group of 10 Greek cities founded in the 4th century BC. These cities controlled a relatively large region of land, creating a region that was colonized and largely populated by Greeks. Decopolis used the Greek language, Greek Architecture, and was culturally Greek in a larger region that used the Aramaic language and was culturally Hebrew and Canaanite. Decapolis is a large Greek colony that supplanted those who were indigenous to the region.

Now, I know that for the most part our ancestors were colonists — we know what that looks like. Jerusalem also knew what it looked like to turn a city into a Greek colony. You might know about the Jewish celebration of Hanukkah. This is the celebration of the cleansing and re-dedication of the Temple. One of the Cities that the Greeks tried to colonize and make culturally Greek was Jerusalem. One of the things they tried to do was to Hellenize the Jews — or, one might say de-Judize them.

The grievances the Jews had against the Greeks were pretty significant. They tried to force them to eat pork, and otherwise violate the Torah so they would better conform to Greek culture, and perhaps the most significant offense was that Antiochus entered Jerusalem and the temple re-dedicated to Zeus. He had an alter of Zeus placed at the alter, and scarified a pig to Zeus in the temple. The Temple was also looted, and copies of the Torah were destroyed.

There was a revolt, and Judas Maccabees and others drove the Greeks out of Jerusalem, rededicated the Temple, and started a new Jewish kingdom — this Jewish kingdom remained independent until it was replaced with Herod’s kingdom; under Herod, they were a client-state of the Roman Empire; meaning they were not colonized but they were not independent either.

Here is the thing, this is a story of Jesus going somewhere uncomfortable for him and his disciples, and there is no obvious reason why he goes there. The city named in Mark implies he walked from morning to dusk into territory run by historic enemies; the last great enemies that the Jewish people fought and drove out of Judah.

His destination was also a place that would have caused discomfort; Jesus goes to a graveyard where none of his own relatives are buried. As you might know there is a taboo of dead bodies, so it violates this taboo for Jesus to enter a foreign graveyard. The Demons introduce themselves as Legion, the Roman equivalent of a modern Brigade — but most important, the demons introduced themselves with the name of what oppresses the Jewish people. When he cast out the demons, they went into a herd of unclean animals — pigs. Everything about Decapolis was something that was foreign to Jesus and his disciples; and the people there begged Jesus to leave when the man was found in his right mind.

What strikes me the most about this story is how one of its elements is not unique, but instead a theme that is repeated. This is not the only time that Jesus goes into a place that makes Jews uncomfortable — it is not the only time he visits historic enemies. The Sunday School lessons skip Chapter 7; in Chapter 7, Jesus goes to Phoenicia, specifically to the region of Tyre; Phoenicia was the last enclave of Canaanites — an ancient enemy of Israel. While Jesus is in Phoenicia, he speaks to a woman and casts a demon out from her daughter. The following miracle has him returning to Decapolis to heal a deaf man.

The pattern I see in this story, and in those following is that Jesus, with no clear reason why, travels to visit Israel’s enemies. Jesus finds a person who is in need of healing, and he saves that person; whether it is a Greek man who is a danger to himself and others, or a Canaanite girl, or a Greek man who is deaf and mute.

In Matthew, I would point to the Sermon on the Mount, where Jesus tells those who hear to love their enemies. In Mark, instead, I see this in a series of stories, very close to one another where Jesus leaves Jewish country to deliberately visit the nations that are historic enemies; and while he is there he offers healing and salvation to those who need it. The first time, there is fear and Jesus is asked to leave, but the second and third time people seek Jesus to ask him to heal somebody they know who needs it.

Sometimes it is easy to think about love for one’s neighbor as something passive. Sometimes we think of it as merely trying to get along. There are many times when I think of things this way — I want to be silent and invisible. I don’t want to make peace so much as I want to avoid conflict. I certainly don’t want to go somewhere uncomfortable. Jesus showed me another way though. Jesus shows me that sometimes loving enemies means going where they are and giving them what they need.

When Peter told these stories of Jesus going to the lands of the Gentiles, and even going to places that were unclean, he told a story that prefigured something in his own life. Peter was the disciple who had the vision that told him that the Church was to accept the Gentiles, without asking them to adopt the customs of the Jews. Peter was also the first apostle to go specifically to the Gentiles — he headed up a mission to Antioch, and he was the first to speak on behalf of the Gentiles to the Church in Jerusalem.

When Jesus went to Greek cities, or Canaanite cities he personally demonstrated that His gospel was of a wider scope than just the people of Judah. Yes, Jesus eventually gave a great Commission that called for the disciples to make disciples even at the ends of the earth — but He did more than speak this, he demonstrated that his mission went beyond the boundaries of his own country and his own people. Jesus saving a Greek man in a Greek graveyard from demon possession is more than another miracle story — it is a story that shows that the gospel is for everyone.

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