Jeremiah 29:1-14: Pray for Babylon

Reading: Jeremiah 29:1-14

Last week I spoke on Psalm 146, and talked to everybody who had hope that they might get their way in the election. Needless to say, I had no idea who would win; but what I said last week still matter. There were no saviors on our ballot, and we don’t need a political savior. I also reminded everybody that the United States has some dark points in our history, and that we have survived these dark times with our nation in tact. Whatever prophecies of gloom we might have seen are likely exaggerations.

This week, I want to talk to those of you who are disappointed in the outcome of the election. I planned to give this message before knowing the outcome of the election. I have decided on the text before I cast my ballot. The thing is about this election is that we elected a man who is opposed by 2/3 of our population. Only 1/4 of registered voters marked “Donald Trump” on their ballots, and it is difficult to say how many of these made this choice with disgust, knowing that if they didn’t Hillary Clinton might win.

The thing is, if the election turned out differently, I could have swapped names and it would have still been true. This is a truly odd election year where both major parties chose candidates who have disapproval ratings above 60%. There were a large number of people on both sides who held their nose while making a choice. In the end I knew that no matter who won, a large number of people would be disappointed in the results, and I know that any Christian leader who is honest will not be able to say we have a great ally in the White House.

I won’t list our next President’s personal problems;  I will simply pray that these do not become an issue in his presidency, I will however tell you about one of our nation’s personal problems: people have differing views on what it means that Trump won the presidency. Some voted because of Trump’s short list for the vacant Supreme court seat. Some voted Trump, or didn’t vote Hillary because he spoke to the concerns of Labor, often in a way that is at odds with the Republicans in congress. Some voted for Trump, because they felt he represented the values of White Nationalists. This last one, the KKK vote is very much a personal problem in our nation. I’m not going to say that it is a huge population, but unfortunately, these people assume that the election of Trump means that real Americans think like the KKK; similarly unfortunate are Trumps opponents who often think the same thing making real conversation and compromise impossible.

This issue has lead to problems which, if you remember started before the election. Unfortunately, some of our racist minority have taken it on themselves to vandalize places of worship, harass and threaten people, there has also been some reports of physical assault. There has been some of that here, and some people close to me have been harassed because of their skin tone in the days since the election. On the other side, there were significant protests against the election results in various cities. USA Today describes these protests as “mostly peaceful”, but it also told about the dozens of protesters who were not, and had to be arrested. I find it disturbing that I live in a world where acts of violence and vandalism are carried out both by those who feel the election validated their views, and by those who are deeply opposed to the winning candidate. This is not not the way Americans act at elections time: no, to quote Hillary Clinton: “Our constitutional democracy enshrines the peaceful transfer of power, and we don’t just respect that, we cherish it.”

My point is, no matter how you voted, there is a good chance that this nation feels different than the America you know and love. I know that it feels different to me. I know it feels different to a lot of people. In general, we love our country, we are proud of our country, and we believe our land to be one of ideals, principles, and hope. We do not expect violence on election day, nor do we expect violence following election day. Today many live in fear: Some live in fear because they are minorities who are targets of anti-minority violence and harassment. Others live in fear because we are facing people who set things on fire hoping somebody will change what has already been decided. No matter what side you are on, the fear that somebody will decide to contest the ballots with bullets is very real.

To be honest, I had to admit long ago that Paul was right when he wrote to the Philippians saying: “Our citizenship in in Heaven.” We are resident aliens of this kingdom of earth. Christianity is far too important, and far too enduring to be co-opted for a political agenda. The truth is, Christ and Paul have nothing to say on how a government should be run; the message in our Bible is a message of how to live in a nation with a different basis for justice than we have and one that was at times hostile to Christians. As Christians, we are truly in our traditional element when we have a message that invites people to be better than the world they live in. What is happening is less than idea, and I miss the nation I remember but I get to look to scripture to help me know what to do. Now, how do we live in such a world?

I personally take the advice that Jeremiah offered to the exiles in Babylon to heart. I admit that there really is no way out of the reality we live it; there is not a political messiah coming that will restore Christianity to America through politics, and we will spend our lifetime living in a secular nation that, whether good or bad, will never really embrace our faith or our values.

Jeremiah’s advice to those who had no choice but to live in Babylon was to live in it. They were to have children, make a home, work, and live a generally normal life. They were not called to overthrow the actually hostile government, but instead to pray for the government and for the prosperity of the city of Babylon. When Jeremiah told the Jews God’s plan was to prosper them, he meant God wanted to prosper them in Babylon.

Here is the thing I learn reading scripture. No matter what we think of our government, our role remains the same:  live the best lives we can. We need to be a blessing to our neighbors, do right by our families, and work for not only our well being but the well being of our neighbors — even the neighbors we disagree with. Jeremiah didn’t call for a revolution, or a fight to win freedom, he called for assimilation and for people to live normal mundane lives that made the world just a little better because they are in it. We love stories of heroes who do great things  but most of us are not heroes, and the accomplishments of normal people are greater than the accomplishments of great leaders. Jesus called us to be salt and light and we are that simply by living the way Jesus taught us;  by making love the rule of our lives. No matter what we think of our nation, it is not right to set it on fire, or hope that our leaders fail. The truth is, we are all in the same boat, so no matter what we think of the Captain.  We want to get to port without sinking. Remember as the nation we live in prospers, we also prosper.

I know none of this is new to you, but I’m going to invite all of you to do one thing that the Jews were told to do for Babylon to pray for the peace and prosperity of the city to pray that it be well governed. If you see our president, or the next one as being Nebuchadnezzar, so be it, but we are still commanded to pray and to work for the good of the place we live in.

Like the results of the election — our first response is clear, so let us respond: let us pray:

  • For the peace and prosperity of the United States, let us pray to the Lord
  • For President Barack Obama, and his successor Donald Trump, let us pray to the Lord
  • For our congressmen and judges, let us pray to the Lord
  • For the peace and prosperity of Indiana, let us pray to the Lord
  • For Governor Mike Pence, and his successor Eric Holcomb, let us pray to the Lord
  • For the peace and prosperity of Henry County and Knightstown, let us pray to the Lord
  • For the County commission and city council, let us pray to the Lord
  • For our policemen and firefighters, let us pray to the Lord
  • For our schools and our educators, let us pray to the Lord
  • For those who serve our community, let us pray to the Lord
  • For the poor and sick in our community, let us pray to the Lord
  • For Raysville Friends church, let us pray to the Lord
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